Pantone announced its 2019 color of the year on Wednesday and it's "Living Coral." Following last year's activism-inspired "ultra violet" champion, this year's reigning color, Pantone 16-1546 or "Living Coral," is described as representative of both our changing social media-drenched environment and our physical one. SEE ALSO: Watching YouTubers use paint-by-numbers kits is wildly soothing On one hand, the color is described as signifying a need for support, caring, and love within an often negative social media landscape. "'Living Coral' embraces us with warmth and nourishment to provide comfort and buoyancy in our continually shifting environment," reads the optimistic statement. "In reaction to the onslaught of digital technology and social media increasingly embedding into daily life, we are seeking authentic and immersive experiences that enable connection and intimacy." On the other hand, with human-induced climate change a rather hot global topic, especially its potentially devastating effects on coral reefs, it's a fitting time for the color. "Living Coral emits the desired, familiar, and energizing aspects of color found in nature," reads Pantone's statement. "Lying at the center of our naturally vivid and chromatic ecosystem, Pantone Living Coral is evocative of how coral reefs provide shelter to a diverse kaleidoscope of color." Yes, it's a stunning color, often found in coral reefs. But with reefs threatened by ocean acidification and coral bleaching caused by human-induced climate change, their colorful existence is set to transform. When marine scientists intentionally pumped carbon dioxide-infused seawater across a patch of Australia's Great Barrier Reef to show just how screwed coral reefs really are, what colour appeared in the water? Looks close to "Living Coral" to us. Marine scientists distributed carbon dioxide-infused seawater across the Great Barrier Reef to simulate how acidic the oceans will likely be in the next few decades.Image: AARON TAKEO NINOKAWA  WATCH: Meet the man biking on water to save the planet — Mashable Originals

Source link

(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)