Mass formation psychosis has become a hot topic among conservative circles in the past few weeks. You can learn more about it here. But the theory is not popular among mainstream media outlets.

The Associated Press and Reuters, the two largest newswire services in the US, decided to try and discredit the theory.

The AP shared the following on Twitter on Saturday:

AP Fact Check on Twitter: “”Mass formation psychosis,” an unfounded theory spreading online, suggests millions of people have been “hypnotized” into believing mainstream ideas to combat COVID-19. Psychology experts say the concept is not supported by evidence. Get the facts @AP. https://t.co/TT61pPFtwL / Twitter”

“Mass formation psychosis,” an unfounded theory spreading online, suggests millions of people have been “hypnotized” into believing mainstream ideas to combat COVID-19. Psychology experts say the concept is not supported by evidence. Get the facts @AP. https://t.co/TT61pPFtwL

Reuters shared the following on Friday:

Reuters Fact Check on Twitter: “Some social media users claim “mass formation psychosis” has occurred during the pandemic. Experts in crowd psychology, however, said this is not a term recognized in the field of psychology, nor is there evidence of any such phenomenon https://t.co/hPO2HrQgGR / Twitter”

Some social media users claim “mass formation psychosis” has occurred during the pandemic. Experts in crowd psychology, however, said this is not a term recognized in the field of psychology, nor is there evidence of any such phenomenon https://t.co/hPO2HrQgGR

Twitter, the hyper-woke social media site, has helped push the narrative. It has continued to share a notice to users that both the AP and Reuters have said that the reports of mass formation psychosis are not true. Reuters was trending on Twitter and the following was shown if users selected to view it.

Mainstream media outlets continue to work to discredit stories related to COVID that do not fit the narrative.

They worked to discredit alternative treatment suggestions by conservative commentators and news outlets. Ivermectin and other potential treatments suggested online were quickly attacked and “fact-checked.” They also discredited all of Donald Trump’s suggestions, such as hydroxychloroquine.

Mainstream outlets also worked to discredit claims that the COVID vaccine would not prevent the spread or acquisition of COVID. While “experts” claimed that the vaccine would work, conservative outlets were quick to share that the mandate would do nothing to stop the spread of the virus.

Conservative outlets have been proven to be correct with the latest Omicron spread. Keep that in mind when considering the mass formation psychosis “fact-check” by these mainstream outlets.

Content syndicated from TheLibertyLoft.com with permission.

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